SC2000 Panel

Convergence at the Extremes: Computational Science meets Networked Sensors

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 10,   8:30 - 10:00 Dallas Texas, Dallas Convention Center
http://www.sc2000.org/panels/index.htm#04

Participants

Moderator: David E. Culler University of California, Berkeley
culler@cs.berkeley.edu
http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~culler
http://tinyos.millennium.berkeley.edu
Panel:  DeborahEstrin Laboratory for Embedded Collaborative Systems (LECS)
University of California, Los Angeles
destrin@cs.ucla.edu
 http://lecs.cs.ucla.edu/~estrin/
Larry Arnstein LabScape: Invisible Computing in the Biology Laboratory
University of Washington
larrya@cs.washington.edu
http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/larrya/
http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/larrya/Labscape.html
  Wahid Hermina  Microscale Science andTechnology Department
Sandia National Laboratories
wlhermi@sandia.gov
http://www.mdl.sandia.gov/scripts/index.asp
  James Demmel  Parallel Simulation for MEMS
University of California, Berkeley
demmel@cs.berkeley.edu
http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~demmel
http://www-bsac.EECS.Berkeley.EDU/~cfm/

Topic

The SC conference has riden the technology waves of the 'killer micro' and the 'killer network' over the past decade.  Two new 'killer technologies' are emerging that hold the potential to radically change the nature computation science.  Microeletromechanical systems (MEMS) make it possible to incorporate tiny sensors into all sorts of computational devices. Low-power CMOS radios make it possible to communicate with minute devices deeply embedded in the physical environment.  Not only do these technologies fundamentally change the degee of instrumentation possible in experiments, they provide a unique means of link computational science and real-time measurement in novel environments.  This panel will explore the potential of these emerging technologies, what really is new, and what difference it all makes.

Panel Presentations